Giving Birth After Trauma

 Sometimes even after the traumatic event is finished, our amygdala becomes sensitized to cues or triggers that remind us of the original overwhelming event, signaling to us that we are in danger even when the danger has long passed. The experiences of pregnancy, labor, birth, and postpartum bring up many triggers for those who have experienced trauma, particularly sexual assault.

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Lorilee Keller
Embracing mindfulness on a snow day

Something about the combination of the beauty and stillness combined with the excitement about something so rare and so fleeting makes snow days absolutely magical.  It wasn’t the kind of excitement present on the most important days of our lives but rather a feeling of aliveness. Something both ordinary and extraordinary at the same time. And that’s when it dawned on me: mindfulness.

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Lorilee Keller
Signs of Postpartum Depression and Anxiety

Although awareness around perinatal mood disorders is spreading, there is still a lot of shame and stigma tied to mental health. In our culture, we internalize a lot of messages about what it means to  “be a good mother”. We often learn that it’s not okay to show vulnerability or to reach out for help.

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Lorilee Keller
Letting Go of Perfectionism

For women, the number one thing that triggers feelings of shame is appearance and body image. Other shame triggers might be infertility, motherhood, or productivity.  We believe that we need to look perfect, eat perfectly, be the perfect mother, and that to be the perfect woman means to be fertile.

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Lorilee Keller
Coping with postpartum and body image

For all the moms in postpartum right now and moms struggling with a history of disordered eating, you are not alone and you are not superficial for struggling to accept your body.  New motherhood is an incredibly challenging time to connect with your body and practice intuitive eating and body respect.

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Lorilee Keller
Are Eating Disorders Actually About Food?

We definitely minimize the experience of those with eating disorders when we say they are only about food.  However we also run the risk of minimizing the normalization of disordered eating in our culture when we say that eating disorders aren’t about food.

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Lorilee Keller